Gluten-Free Flatbread Crackers

I have a recipe for delicious flatbread crackers that are naturally gluten-free. I got the idea from growing up watching my mom make Indian parathas, and then from making communion bread with my teammate Kara in East Africa, where matzoh crackers were decidedly not available.

So I still make them for when we have house church because I can’t eat gluten, and matzohs are still out. Everyone loves them so much, the remaining crackers disappear within minutes after the service is over. It tastes even better than if it were made with wheat. That’s how good it is.

flatbread10I put a half-cup chickpea flour and a half-cup chestnut flour. This is naturally sweet so it makes the crackers taste good without adding any sugar. I put a teaspoon of large grain sea salt. It’s important that it’s large grain. And I put three tablespoons of olive oil.

flatbread1The oil provides some moisture, and to get enough to form the dough into a ball, I usually hold the bowl next to the sink, and flick handfuls of water into the floury mixture until it looks right. But to be more precise, take a 1/4 cup of water and add it bit by bit until the dough is moist. You may not need it all.

flatbread2I sprinkle the board with a regular GF flour mix, which is made of corn, rice, potato and xanthum gum.

flatbread3And then I divide the dough in two and roll it out.

flatbread6This is how thin it should be – thinness is important.

flatbread4I heat some olive oil in a skillet until it’s almost smoking. (Iron skillet is best if you have one). And then I put the first flatbread in and turn the heat down to medium.

flatbread5Flip it over when it’s done and make sure both sides are brown, and the cracker is fairly dry. It tastes better crunchy, rather than chewy.

And voila!

It’s good! Something about that sweet chestnut flour with the bits of sea salt you get in each bite.

flatbread7Perfect for munching, and perfect for a gluten-free communion bread (with our alcohol-free red wine).

flatbread9Communion bread should be salty, don’t you think?

After all - are we not the salt of the earth? ;-)

 

Gluten-Free Flatbread Crackers
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
From:
Recipe type: Appetizer
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • ½ cup chickpea flour
  • ½ cup chestnut flour
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • up to ¼ cup water
Instructions
  1. Mix the ingredients and knead the dough.
  2. Heat the skillet with some olive oil until hot.
  3. Roll the dough out thinly.
  4. Cook the dough until it's lightly browned on both sides and dry. It tastes better when it's not moist.

 

I am the daughter of a symphony musician who was raised in upstate New York, and I simply breathe all things classical, be it music or 19th century literature (English and Russian). I married Sir Renaissance in New York City, and before I knew it, he had swept me up and brought me back home to his own country. So here we are. Three children, a rather ordinary life in a rather exceptional place. I am now ‘A Lady in France.’

Posted in Appetizers, Bread & Breakfast, Food, Tout le Reste (Everything else), Tutorials
3 comments on “Gluten-Free Flatbread Crackers
  1. Alison says:

    Yum, I want some!
    It’s really hard to find gluten-free flour here, so I might just make some regular ones!
    Alison recently posted…Through The Lens Thursday #24: DeepMy Profile

  2. cannot begin to tell you how excited my mother is about this recipe ;)
    sisters from another mister recently posted…Fatherless ChildrenMy Profile

  3. Andrea says:

    Yum! I would like to try these different flours – the chestnut one sounds delish.
    Andrea recently posted…Gone For NowMy Profile

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